PIFcamp #4 sound projects

It seems like the latest PIFcamp, well, its amazing participants, produced more  sound related projects than we anticipated! We are re-posting some of them so you can all take a sound trip down the Soča memory lane.

Juan Manuel Escalante: Sounds of Soča (Zvoki Soče)

Photo by J. M. Escalante

Zvoki Soče is a one week project made in the Julian Alps during PIFcamp 2018, featuring field recordings, electronic sounds and visual scores.

Photo by J. M. Escalante

Alexander Phleps: “Create one piece of sound every day”

Alexander made an audio collage of various sound & field recordings (also featuring jam sessions) during PIFcamp and turned them into 7 tracks – each for every day. Listen to them here:

Ina Thomann (Lino Leum): Sonance Garden

Listen the 2-minute recording from Ina’s installation Sonance Garden in which 3 sensors influenced the sound of the PIFcamp environment:

Aleš Januš Luznar (Yanoosh): Ictus Cordis

During PIFcamp Yanoosh was working on an audiovisual project where his hearth is used as an instrument. In Ictus Cordis the artist explores the application of the biofeedback method or a mutual heart reaction to the stream of a sound composition as an artistic inspiration. The project was presented in Ljubljana on 24, 25 & 26 November.

Video Sonification and the Manipulation of Field Recordings

Connor Haynes will be exploring different compositional techniques in this project, using the environment both sonically, and visually to produce A/V compositions. With emphasis on field recordings as a raw sound source, such sounds will be manipulated in concrete fashion and mixed with sound produced from video to sound patches inside Max Msp/Jitter, using the environment to create the sonic landscape. The A/V compositions may hopefully be completed at the camp but perhaps they may be finished at home and shared online depending on the camps time constraints. 

The Symphony of the Hearth (by Yanoosh)

The Symphony of the Hearth is a project that explores the effects of the hearth beat and various images on our brain waves and the cardio-vascular system.

With the use of multi-channel sampling, the hearth is used as an instrument. These get modulated in real time and thus become the basis of the audio performance. “I will also use an Arduino pulse sensor to trigger the visuals and to control the tempo of the composition, the tempo of the sampler and the effects.”

The Space of Futurization – building a prototype

The Space of Futurization is a project by Anna Sircova.

This immersive interactive installation is envisaged to create a space where a person would physically feel what type imagery and associations people have with the term ‘futurization’. It will allow to physically experiencing the contradictions embedded in the present and uncertainty of moving towards the future by architecturally constructing the space that would influence the human body and senses.

During the PIF camp I’m planning to concentrate on creating a prototype and test some of the elements for the final installation. I would like to explore how to create a certain interactive emotional space, through visuals and sounds (possibly smells), that in one part of the installation would enhance one particular emotion / feeling and something different in another part.

Radical Listening (w/ J. M. Escalante)

Juan Manuel Escalante will explore the intersections of field recordings, mappings, graphic notations and concrete sound explorations using a modular synthesizer.

“I plan to record different sounds at different locations and map them accordingly on my sketchbook. Based on those sounds, a graphic notation will be generated and used as a tool to arrange sounds in time. Sounds might be remixed using a synthesizer (either at the camp or back home). Either an OP-1 or an eurorack modular synthesizer.

The result could/might be shared online as an interactive map or browser piece similar as our previous “Radical Listening” exploration.”

Wi-Fi poets and hotspot ninjas

Dmitry Morozov ::vtol:: will fully exploit the ESP8266, a low-cost Wi-Fi microchip with full TCP/IP stack and microcontroller capability. Project will be developed over 3 stages, from very simple to more advance.

First stage of project is focused on creating hot-spot poetic machines, an autonomous micro-device which distributes Wi-Fi masked as wireless network, visible to any gadget such as a smartphone or a laptop. The device is automatically renaming its network every 10 seconds, taking as its name various lines of poems by famous poets.

The goal of the second stage is to create crazy Wi-Fi name SSIDs spam machine, similar to this one.

The third round of the projects gains to create a machine that can be used to create your own network, chat,… your personal internet actually. Hot Ninja is a multifunctional network device for autonomous activity in the city environment. Its main function is communication and propaganda through the Wi-FI wireless standard. This is the hacktivism DIY response to attempts by the authorities in different countries to control the Internet. And should be fun to try it out in the mountains!

Do you want to participate in The Mystery IC Challenge?

Know more about Michael Page will do at PIF this year!

 

 

“At PIFcamp I will generally be assisting with DIY electronics. As a creative technologist, artist and educator I have the following skills and interests to bring to the party: Simple circuit design, CMOS tricks, PCB fabrication, Manhattan style, advanced kludging, electro-mechanical implementations, deep thoughts & sassy dance moves. I am currently designing a CMOS groovebox & I will probably still be working on that during PIF. If time permits I will also host the greatly anticipated THE MYSTERY ICHALLENGE!!!”

Sonance Garden

Ina Thomann will be turning the camp area into a sonic ecosystem.

“I will build and program sensors around the area which will control effects and filters that in turn will manipulate the captured sounds of the camp.

So, don’t be irritated if you see me sitting anywhere in the camp with a little microphone, trying to catch the sounds all around.

As I’m trying to improve my skills on live coding in Supercollider I’m looking forward to a week full of live manipulating the sounds around me.

You can feel free to interact with the sensors. (In fact, you will be involved anyway just by passing the sensor.) I would appreciate if you just have fun with manipulating the sensors and taking part in my sound installation.”

Aeolian Artefacts

Project by Juan Duarte consists of sound devices that enable an experience of Augmented Listening of wind forces. It focuses on subtle changes in an outdoor environment to create generative soundscapes. Wind-sensitive systems are used to detect orientation and speed of the wind. These create acoustic events, that are registered and processed as a generative sound piece by a network of sensor networks.

The work takes as a reference an ancient instrument that is known as the Aeolian Harp (cf.  Kircher, A ca 1650.). The mechanism used the aleatoric forces (wind) to  self-play the strings and resonators. This enabled holy spaces, such as mountains and temples, to “speak” to humans.


“I am specifically interested in creating a series of devices that depend on wind forces to transmit a generative sound piece over FM radio. I will bring electronic components to build a number of devices with PIFcamp participants, based on previous experiments I’ve done recently. The device includes an FM radio transmitter and a micro-controller with environmental sensors.”

Here is some project related documentation.

Wild Food or How to Hack Your Food Supply

Local wild edible plants expert Dario Cortese will once again enrich PIFcamp’s eating habits, tastes and minds!

Majority of the wild plants which grow all around are edible. Some are not. It is nice that you know both types.

As our food supply started changing dramatically some 10.000 years ago, starting from Middle East, not to mention a vast change after the so-called industrial revolution – and especially in the mid-20th century -, we tend to eat food that grows on market shelves and sometimes in the gardens, too. But the wild edibles are still around, plenty of them. You may prepare them in different ways, combined with cultivated food, for which you shouldn’t spend too much money, e.g. pulses, some grains, root vegetables, potatoes, etc. Fats are needed, too. A pinch of salt.

We’ll try to figure out what would be a cost for the annual ration of food combined in the above manner. But the money doesn’t really count; what is really important is the experience and knowledge that you are not dependent on the industrial food supply. Not to mention the energizing effect of wild food.

Materials & Tools: edible wild plants are all around, tools are us. Some pots and pans are always in the kitchen.