How about mechatronics in nature? (w/ Lovrenc Košenina)


Lovrenc Košenina will be working on a weather station and a robo-arm, which will use the data collected to cater to the plants. The weather station will have temperature, moisture, UV, air pressure and wind sensors and anyone will be able to access the collected data through the open-source network of the Weather Underground. The robo-arm will be made of laser-cut pieces, and will use Arduino-controlled servomotors for movement. Initially, the robo-arm will be game-pad controlled, but will be upgraded to automation after PIFcamp.
Lovrenc also plans to throw a workshop in which participants will make generic pliers for a large range of use and design modular add-ons.

Audible Healing Pressure Points

The project Audible Healing Pressure Points is a continuation of Lavoslava Benčić‘s work in e-textiles and follows her collection of interactive gloves (2016-2018) made at Rampa Lab. In the project Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is combined with research in e-textiles. The project proposes to position electronic acoustic devices on the healing points which lower or heal pain, usually massaged or pressed on by a therapist. The results of the project will be a series of e-bio textile elements made of fungi with an integrated circuit, which creates sound upon applying pressure.

The purposes of the project:

  • To find out how to combine electronics, bio textile and TCM methods of pain relief
  • To learn whether the therapeutic pressure on the healing points combined with generated acoustic frequencies can help establish a better bond between the therapist and the treated
  • To see whether a combination of pressure and sound can induce more effective healing / pain reduction
  • To combine the principles and potentials of wearable electronics and the effects of Oriental medicine in pain management
  • To make wearable healing elements made of e-bio-textiles, which will respond during therapy  (applied pressure / massage) with sound (dedicated frequencies)

The Smart Jacket (by Sanja Hrvaćanin & Eva Pondrk)

The starting point for the project by Sanja Hrvaćanin and Eva Pondrk is to make a Smart jacket for bicyclists with indicators (turn signals) for better visibility and bikers safety in traffic. It will combine sensors and electronics.

The plan
Day 1: e-textile basics (getting to know the basics)
Day 2: making the basic e-textile circuit
Day 3: reuse of an old garment into a smart and enhanced prototype (LEDs and sensors and more …)
Day 4: continue making the prototypes
Day 5: finishing the prototypes
Day 6: presentation of the prototypes and the Smart Jacket (or/and light)

Trivolan by Boštjan Čadež – Fšk

Joining us for the first time this year is a Slovenian artist, phenomenal VJ and the author of the classic internet game Line Rider, Boštjan Čadež-Fšk. He is going to develop a DIY haptic interface.

“Trivolan is going to be a MIDI controller, that will enable control of three parameters in relation to the position of the handle in the space. The inspiration is the haptic interface by Force Dimension, which I was able to test at the Faculty of Computer and Information Science in Ljubljana. As soon as I’ve tested it (or maybe even since a bit before that) I wanted to have something similar for my video performances. Unfortunately even the cheapest version of Omega3 starts at about 17.000,00 EUR, way too much for starving artists, who just want to control three things at once in an intuitive way. That’s why I’ve decided to build one by myself. Unfortunately I’ll have to sacrifice the force feedback function, that the Omega offers, but I think there will be no tears, realising that it costs about 200-times less.

After I’m done and the dust in the workshop settles, I will publish the plans and the code on teh internets, for other creative minds that wish for better controllers.”

Synthesizers In The Wild with Bastl Instruments

Václav Peloušek from the awesome Bastl Instruments collective is joining us again this year, check out what project(s) he has in mind!

“This year at PIF I would like to focus on making very simple circuits that can help to translate any kind of analog environmental information into useful signals for synthesizers. The previous years Eurorack module called Sense was used mainly to do these translations – either for electronic textiles (remember my magic shoes) or for other natural contacts and sensors (performance with Hannah, Mika, Andy and others). Such circuits can be easily obtained by using operational amplifiers, or simple microcontrollers – this time running on batteries. Having battery/USB/solar powered synths (we already have those: Kastle, Softpop, Nature synth …) and sensoric interfaces (lets build these!) can allow for permanent sophisticated synth installations in the wild. I was really pleased by the ease of connecting with other projects and nodes thru the Sense module last year that I was planning to do a mini usb powered version of it. Maybe I will have few prototypes with me.

For those who don’t have any battery powered synth I can offer soldering workshop for Kastle and also theory & practice on how to convert – resistance/low voltages into useful control voltages. I can also offer beginner introductions into modular synthesis.

Besides this romantic goal of trying to be as far from the computers as possible I would like to bring more synths, instruments and other gear for people to play and jam with. Evening jams were F I R E last year and would be great to continue this.”

Hacking Our Hands project by Hannah Perner-Wilson

“What wonderful contraptions, these tools attached to the ends of our arms. From coding to crochet, human making involves the use of our hands to interface with the world.” Find out what our e-textiles and wearable node host Hannah Perner-Wilson will work on this year.

In order to find out more about these fleshy machines, shall we attempt to hack them?

We can add sensors to sense ourselves making. We can add actuators to enact new actions. And lets hack our hands using local and natural materials – sewing leaf gloves, carving twig tweezers, constructing bark armor, molding mushroom pincushions …


Find more about Hannah’s project here.

PIFrecipes by Dario Cortese

Carrot salad with wild herbs 1.0

Grate the carrots and put them in a salad bowl. Add pumpkin oil, vinegar and dry-roasted sesame seeds. Then add some yarrow (Achillea millefolium) and mugwort (common wormwood, Artemisia vulgaris) flowers with some finely cut leaves of both plants. The more flowers and leaves you add, the stronger will these aromatics flavor the salad, so do not add to much, as they are truly aromatic. Decorate the salad with the flowers of annual plant fleabane (Erigeron annuus), which have a slightly pepperish taste. Mix and, yes, that’s it. Enjoy!
You may add salt too, but at least taste the salad without it first.

Carrot salad with wild herbs 1.1

Prepare the carrots and add pumpkin oil, vinegar and roasted sesame seeds, just like in 1.0. Then add unripe fruits of one big inflorescence of wild angelica (Angelica sylvestris) per salad bowl. Mix and enjoy.

Tomato salad with raw nettle sauce & wild carrot

Put some olive oil and vinegar in a big bowl, cut three or four tomatoes, put them into the bowl and add quite a big bunch of nettle shoots (Urtica dioica) and/or young leaves. Three or more pinches of chopped wild carrot leaves (Daucus carota) won’t hurt. Salt a bit more than usually, as this works as the sauce aka some kind of nettle gazpacho for the tomatoes.
Mix in a blender until you get something like a semi thick liquid sauce.
Cut more tomatoes and put them in an appropriate salad bowl. Pour the nettle-gazpacho-sauce over them and add a bowl or two of wild carrot flowers without their stems. Mix with a spoon and let it sit for a while so aromas develop. Decorate with wild carrot flower(s) and if there is some wild garlic around put its flowers and flower bulbs on top.

Ice matea with burnet

Put 3 tablespoons of yerba mate in 2 liters of cold water and stir. Crush a bunch of burnet (Sanguisorba minor) leaves slightly with your hands and add them to the cold infusion. Leave it to stand for at least a couple of hours or overnight. Then strain it, chill it or add ice cubes and taste the wild ice matea. The aroma of burnet leaves is not that far away from melons and cucumbers. And yes, the taste of mate is also very present.

Fresh cheese spread/dip with calamint

Combine one kilogram of fresh cheese, e.g. cottage cheese, with half a kilogram of sour cream. Add a handful of finely chopped calamint (Calamintha brauneana or any other Calamintha species) leaves and flowers, some olive oil and salt. Mix well and let it stand for a while, preferably for a few hours or overnight. Serve as a spread on bread, as a dip with chunks of raw vegetables, with cooked potatoes, as an addition to salads etc.

Nettle chips

Collect as much nettle (Urtica dioica) tops as you can. The flower buds with older leaves are also excellent. Collect them just before they start to flower and trim their tough stem away.
Heat some oil (e.g. coconut oil), lard or ghee in a pan and fry the nettles for a short while; around a minute is usually enough. Take the nettles out as soon as they become crunchy and the fat stops foaming. The aim is to keep them (dark) green; if they are turning brown, it is really high time to take them out. Sprinkle with salt, mix lightly and enjoy.

Roseroot pifmethamine

Collect 20 roseroot (Rhodiola rosea) stalks and trim off the leaves. Put them in a blender, add a liter of apple/pear brandy or vodka and blend well. Leave the mixture standing for a while, so the crushed leaves settle on the bottom of the container. Then pour off the liquid and store it in a closed bottle. Drinking 30 to 60 milliliters of the concoction has a nice and invigorating effect. Do not throw the crushed leaves away, but use one or two teaspoons as an addition to any tea.

 

Want to know more about the plants mentioned here and their uses? Check them out on the internet. Wikipedia is a quite nice basic informative source. The easiest way to be sure you are reading about the right plant is to type in their Latin name.